Restoration Projects

Naperville Park District manages more than 2,400 acres of park land, which includes both natural areas and landscaped areas. As part of its commitment to caring for the environment, the Park District works to restore the health and diversity of natural areas, including woodlands, park meadows, shorelines, ponds and streams, and prairies. Landscaped areas in parks, such as perennial plantings at playgrounds and trees along fences, may need restoration as well. Restoration work involves removing invasive trees and plants to allow a variety of native trees and plants to grow and flourish. Restoration also may include planting native or desirable trees and plants, grading, and other work depending on the location.

Current or Upcoming Restoration Projects

Hobson West Ponds, 1047 S. West Street- The first phase of woody invasive removal took place in summer of 2022, and phase two is scheduled for winter. Staff will clear remaining buckthorn, white mulberry, honeysuckle, white poplar, and pear trees throughout the natural area, with a focus around the north pond.

May Watts Park, 804 S. Whispering Hills Drive - Woody invasive plants, including black alder and pear trees, are being removed along the pond shoreline to better stabilize the area around the pond, minimize erosion, and enhance water quality. Invasive plants also will be removed from the hill near Whispering Hills Drive to create a healthy prairie ecosystem.

DuPage River Park, 808 Royce Road - This project will begin with removal of invasive shrubs and trees along the river shoreline and near a natural area known as a fen. Both areas will be restored with a seed mixture of native plants to protect the shoreline from erosion and promote a healthy, diverse ecosystem in both locations.

Knoch Knolls Park, 320 Knoch Knolls Road - Woody plants, including box elder trees and invasive buckthorn and honeysuckle, are being removed along the river shoreline to better stabilize the banks, minimize erosion, and enhance water quality in the river. Following removals, the area will be planted with a seed mixture of native plants to protect the shoreline from erosion and promote a healthy, diverse ecosystem.

Summerfield Lake Park, 2003 Skylane Drive - Invasive shrubs and trees, including sandbar willows and pear trees, are being removed along the pond shoreline to better stabilize the banks, minimize erosion, and enhance water quality in the pond. Following removals, the area will be planted with a seed mixture of native plants to protect the shoreline from erosion and promote a healthy, diverse ecosystem.


North Parks Division
(No North Parks projects this season; future projects to be listed at a later time.)